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Development and Testing Advancements in Spectral Wave Measurements, and Nearshore Process Methods for Risk-Based Guidance

Type: Posted • Opportunity: W81EWF-24-SOI-0012

Description

In the field of surface gravity wave estimation and research, there is a need for data to update and improve state-of-the-art wave modeling technologies. The collection of high-resolution directional wave measurements at strategic locations along all US coastal waters is essential to a continued collaborative development and evaluation of state-of-the-art wave modeling technologies that support public, private, and commercial users. High-resolution directional wave measurements are used to assess predictive spectral wave model performance and are paramount to understanding the mechanisms affecting the temporal and spatial variability in the wave climate. New and innovative techniques are needed to quantify model to measurement errors. Field experiments with multiple buoy systems are needed to perform necessary analysis on wave generation source terms (atmospheric input, nonlinear wave-wave interaction, dissipation, shallow water wave-bottom effects, etc.) and will lead to better wave models and more accurate long-term wave estimates.

With an increased amount of long-term data records available, tracking monthly, annual, and multi-decadal changes in climate variability will be related to large-scale markers such as the Pacific Decadal Oscillation, the North Atlantic Oscillation, and the El Nino Southern Oscillation (PDO, NAO, and ENSO). Long-term measurements seldom are continuous, and occasionally miss storm extremes. New and innovative techniques (RH-Tests for Homogeneity, Neural Network, temporal correlation functions, and geo-statistical interpolation) to fill those gaps are needed in the USACE's wave climate studies.

New, innovative wave measurement systems such as small drifters could be deployed in areas where moored buoys are unable to perform. Water bodies containing ice (annual development and decay), and persistent currents as in the case of the Florida and Gulf Stream, are areas where drifters could be applicable. It is equally important to ascertain the energy derived from distant storm events originating in the far northwestern Pacific Ocean where moored buoys could not be deployed, and altimeters, despite their resounding success, may not be able to measure extreme significant wave heights in the events. An array of drifters could monitor areas, transmitting real-time directional wave data until its power supply fails.

Waves are the primary energy input into the coastal zone. As they reach shallow water, waves interact with near-coast bathymetry transforming until they break in the surf zone. Surf-zone wave processes drive complex circulation patterns and ultimately result in sediment transport and morphology evolution. In addition, inundation at the shoreline is directly controlled by the transformation of infragravity and sea-swell waves across the surf-zone bathymetry and beach foreshore. Wave-driven setup and run-up can be large during storms and alongshore gradients in wave setup can drive surf-zone flows. The resultant bathymetric and topographic evolution (m's of vertical change) can be rapid (minutes to days) and vary in space and time over the course of a storm. This morphological evolution is driven by interactions between cross-shore undertow, alongshore currents, and oscillatory incident- and infragravity wave-driven flows to change sediment transport magnitude and direction. While many of the aforementioned wave and hydrodynamic processes are fairly well understood and can be well simulated with state-of-the-art coastal numerical models, the resultant sediment transport is poorly understood. Estimating morphology evolution at longer time scales involves summing over these short timescales, while including potential changes in wave climate, water level, and sediment supply. Basic research on sediment transport at a range of spatial and temporal scales is needed to drive improvements in the USACE's ability to properly manage both sediment and risks during coastal storms and over project-relevant (30-year) timescales.

Background
The US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) is seeking applications for data services measuring waves, currents, and coastal morphologic response to improve the understanding and modeling of physical processes driving coastal change. Waves are the primary forcing function affecting the USACE’s coastal engineering work and mission, and spatial and temporal variations in wave climate can impact spatial variability of coastal evolution. Long-term monitoring of both waves and coastal morphology are required to quantify the influence of climate change and assess the risks of future damage to the coastal environment.

Grant Details
The project aims to collect high-resolution directional wave measurements at strategic locations along all US coastal waters to support the development and evaluation of state-of-the-art wave modeling technologies. It also involves executing field experiments with multiple buoy systems to analyze wave generation source terms, tracking monthly, annual, and multi-decadal changes in climate variability, deploying new innovative wave measurement systems such as small drifters in areas where moored buoys are unable to perform, and conducting basic research on sediment transport at a range of spatial and temporal scales.

Eligibility Requirements
This opportunity is restricted to non-federal partners of the Southwest Cooperative Ecosystems Studies Unit (CESU). Applicants must have expert knowledge and experience handling wave measurement systems, technical expertise in field data collection, analysis, and numerical modeling of surf-zone morphodynamical processes, strong signal processing skills, excellent publication record on these topics, and proven experience collecting in-situ and remotely sensed data successfully in the nearshore region.

Period of Performance
The anticipated period of performance is 1-year base period, with 4 one-year option periods for a total of 5 years.

Grant Value
$40,000,000.00 is the estimated total program funding with an expected amount of funding for initial award at $6,000,000.00.

Place of Performance
The project will involve national wave measurements along all US coasts (including the Great Lakes and US Territorial waters) as well as long-term large-scale beach and surf-zone morphological data collection along the southern California coastline.

Overview

Category of Funding
Science and Technology and other Research and Development
Funding Instruments
Cooperative Agreement
Grant Category
Discretionary
Cost Sharing / Matching Requirement
False
Source
On 1/9/24 Engineer Research and Development Center posted grant opportunity W81EWF-24-SOI-0012 for Development and Testing Advancements in Spectral Wave Measurements, and Nearshore Process Methods for Risk-Based Guidance with funding of $40.0 million. The grant will be issued under grant program 12.630 Basic, Applied, and Advanced Research in Science and Engineering. It is expected that one grant will be made.

Timing

Posted Date
Jan. 9, 2024, 12:00 a.m. EST
Closing Date
March 11, 2024, 12:00 a.m. EDT Due in 6 Days
Last Updated
Jan. 9, 2024, 5:00 p.m. EST
Version
1
Archive Date
April 10, 2024

Eligibility

Eligible Applicants
Others (see text field entitled "Additional Information on Eligibility" for clarification)
Additional Info
This opportunity is restricted to non-federal partners of the Desert Southwest Cooperative Ecosystems Studies Unit (CESU).

Award Sizing

Ceiling
$6,500,000
Floor
Not Listed
Estimated Program Funding
$40,000,000
Estimated Number of Grants
1

Contacts

Contact
Kisha Craig Contract Specialist
Email Description
Kisha M. Craig
Contact Phone
(601) 634-5397

Documents

Posted documents for W81EWF-24-SOI-0012

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