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Industry Day KTR Inquiries Govt Responses 20211202.pdf

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Dec. 2, 2021, 9 a.m.
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Norfolk Harbor Deepening Industry Day
Inquiries and Government Responses

Inquiry 1:
Plans provided show a required depth of ‐56ft with a 2ft buffer to a not to exceed depth of ‐ 58ft;
however, during the Industry Day Meeting, it was stated that the required depth would be ‐55ft with a 3ft
buffer to the not to exceed depth of ‐58ft. Please clarify what will be the required dimensions of the
dredging areas.

30 November 2021

Government Response:
For Channel to Newport News, the base bid includes a required depth of -55 feet with one foot of
allowable overdepth. The option bid item would have a required depth of -56 feet with one foot of
allowable overdepth. For Norfolk Harbor Inner Channel, the base bid includes a required depth of
-54 feet with one foot of allowable overdepth. The option bid items would have a required depth
of up to -56 feet with one foot of allowable overdepth. Not to exceed depth of -58 feet for both
channels.

Inquiry 2:
Plans provided show a required depth of ‐56ft and a not to exceed depth of ‐58ft. A 2ft buffer between the
required depth and the NTE is insufficient and will make it difficult, if not impossible, for the Contractor
to achieve acceptance. Please reconsider the NTE depth or the required depth for the project.

Government Response:
Dredged material associated with Norfolk Harbor Inner Channels and Channel to Newport News
has been characterized for environmental compliance to a depth of -60 feet MLLW. Due to
limited capacity at the Craney Island Dredged Material Management Area (CIDMMA), very little
excess (non-pay) material will be allowed. Allowing a maximum dredging depth of -58 feet
MLLW (or one foot of non-pay material throughout the entire Project) is the most that can be
considered due to the current capacity limits at the CIDMMA.

Inquiry 3:
What depth is the material characterized to? 3‐foot of buffer below Grade is not enough for new work
dredging. For hydraulic dredging, material will be disturbed and removed well below 3 feet below Grade.
The NTE depth should be at least 4 feet below the Overdepth elevation, with characterization of materials
below that.

Government Response:
Vibracore, Boring, and CPT data was taken within Norfolk Harbor Inner Channel and Channel to
Newport News to varying depths up to -90 feet, as shown in the geotechnical appendices attached
to the plans and specs.

Inquiry 4:
Section 01 14 00 Part 1.3.1 SPECIAL WORK REQUIREMENTS AND CONDITIONS Paragraph d (2)
CELL ROTATION REQUIREMENTS AT THE PLACEMENT SITE specifies requirements for disposal
in Craney Island and states that “dredged material placed by hydraulic method may not exceed a rate of
22,500 cubic yards in 24‐hours period”. Please clarify the following:

a. Will the quantity above the daily limit be allowed to be placed in an alternative ocean disposal site?

Government Response:

Limit of 22,500 CY per 24-hour period only applies to placement at Craney Island. The Dredge
Material Management Plan for this project identifies Craney Island as the primary location for
placement of dredged material. Ocean disposal at the Norfolk Ocean Disposal Site was evaluated
and considered but deemed to be cost prohibitive.

b. If an alternate disposal area is not provided for the quantity above the specified limit at Craney Island,
will the Contractor be required to shut down all pumping activities?

Government Response:
In general, the Contractor shall not pump greater than 22,500 CY into Craney Island in any given
24-hour period. The Contractor may be able to increase pumping volume if they can successfully
demonstrate ability to increase pumping volume while maintaining freeboard and water quality
requirements. This is subject to Contracting Officer approval and not guaranteed.

c. Will the Contractor be paid at a standby rate unit if a shutdown is required due to reaching the daily
disposal limit? This is a great risk that requires the contract to contain CLIN’s for standby. All bidders
need to make the same assumptions when pricing.

Government Response:
Standby time will not be paid if a shutdown is required due to reaching the daily disposal limit.

d. Why is there a placement limit? What factors/calculations were made in determining this limit?

Government Response:
The placement limit per 24-hour period has been determined based on the size and geometry of
the Craney Island cells and is required to ensure Commonwealth effluent water quality standards
are maintained at the spillboxes. The primary factors include weir length of each of the
spillways, ponded depth and area required in front of each of the spillways, settlement time of the
suspended solids and required ponded area for settlement to occur, and empirical observations
and information collected over the past twenty years.

Inquiry 5:
Section 01 14 00 Part 1.3.1 SPECIAL WORK REQUIREMENTS AND CONDITIONS Paragraph d (3)
CELL ROTATION REQUIREMENTS AT THE PLACEMENT SITE specifies requirements for disposal
in Craney Island and states that “The facility manager has the discretion to direct users of CIDMMA in
their placement of material based on cell capacity, or functionality of the appurtenances. At any time, the
Contractor may be required to re‐arrange the placement sequence and move the discharge point to a
different containment cell as directed by the Contracting Officer. Daily placement rate may also be
limited during period of time.” It is crucial for planning of equipment, pipeline, and personnel to know in
advance the location of the discharge point at the disposal area and to have a plan as to how the project
will proceed. The Contractor should be compensated for via standby CLIN’s for unplanned delays that
may increase the cost of the operation due to the decisions of the Facility Manager or the Contracting
Officer? Will the contract include standby CLIN’s for disposal site delays?

Government Response:
The approximate discharge location will be provided on the plans; however, the exact location of
deposit will be established by the contracting officer before commencement of work. There will
be no CLIN for standby time for disposal delays.

Inquiry 6:

Section 01 57 50 Paragraph 3.1 ENDANGERED SPECIES MONITORING states “The Contractor shall
identify specific personnel to monitor the visible action area from the dredge plant.” Will the personnel
identified as endangered species observers be required to only focus on that task? Or will they be allowed
to work on other tasks?

Government Response:
This person would be the equivalent of a “bridge watch” not a NMFS certified Protected Species
Observer. This person shall be trained in endangered species identification and protocols
(USACE provides the training). This person shall monitor the visible action area and equipment
for the presence of endangered species during dredging. Other tasks could potentially be
completed so long as they do not interfere with the ability to monitor the visible action area and
dredge plant for endangered species and/or their parts.

Inquiry 7:
Daily effluent visual checks and samples to check for TSS on each spillway are required. Will
the Contractor be allowed to self‐perform this work?

Government Response:
The contractor is required to self-perform the work using a Hach DR 900 Multiparameter
Portable Colorimeter or approved equal for TSS as well as provide visual inspections every four
hours throughout the day. Visual Inspections and TSS readings are required to be logged daily via
the USACE Water Quality Database.

Inquiry 8:
During the Industry Day meeting, it was mentioned that MEC’s and Endangered Species takes could
require the shutdown of dredging activities. Will a standby unit rate CLIN be provided to compensate for
this time?

Government Response:
The Government is still considering the feasibility of allowing standby time for specific case
scenarios that involve endangered species takes and MEC encounters that substantially disrupt
dredging operations. Final decision will be made prior to contract solicitation.

Inquiry 9:
Section 35 20 23 Paragraph SECURITY AND PUBLIC SAFETY OF WORK AREAS states, “Unless
directed otherwise, the Contractor may perform the scheduled dredging work 24 hours a day, 7 days a
week.” Please clarify the following:

a. What would be a cause for the Contractor to be directed to limit the dredging schedule?

Government Response:
Including but not limited to the following. A safety concern, accident, or emergency that requires
a stand-down of operations. Weather event that requires suspension of work and safe harbor
procedures, unable to satisfy freeboard or water quality requirements, violation of requirements
outlined in COMMANDER’S POLICY MEMORANDUM NUMBER WRD‐01.

b. Will you provide a standby unit rate that will be used as compensation if the Contractor is required to
work on a limited schedule?

Government Response:

No standby time will be provided for compensation if the Contractor is required to work on a
limited schedule for an interim time period in context of Section 35 20 23 Paragraph SECURITY
AND PUBLIC SAFETY OF WORK AREAS.

Inquiry 10:
Section 35 20 23 Paragraph 1.4.3 COORDINATION WITH OTHER CONTRACTORS states that “other
contracts may be in force for the construction of other features of work on or adjacent to the site of work
being accomplished under this contract.” Please clarify … Show All